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john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has already criticized the u.k. coalition government from backing away from his original proposal while the european commission's recent report summarizing the responses received to the likennen report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating: in general banks welcome the group's analysis but argue that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh on a financial industry and harmful to markets, i think it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or likennen proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations wall street's harshest critics set forth are true, even if our finan
'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will someday realize these principles in the deck decla
a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very strong and rapid responses to the contaminant, which we have seen. but many of the other insect groups, for in
person in the staff, they read a book called "rising tide," help me with the author? >> john berry. >> john berry. it is the history of how the mississippi river was changed to accommodate navigation and the impacts of the flood creating the conditions that we actually saw during hurricane katrina, but i highly recommend that. from our learnings in the gulf, what would you do to help develop resiliency in low income and rural communities that we know face disasters, especially in regards to the potential for hydrofracking? >> yeah. has not been asked a hard question yet. [laughter] >> that's a very good question. what i say we learned from the gulf and from similar disasters around the world is that it's really with social impact, fear about the chemicals or a whole series of different things that are fixable if we can improve our communication skills, our knowledge, and our willingness to share and tell the truth. to me, one of the most telling problems that came out of the gulf was was dispercent. how many of you heard of that? nearly everybody raises their hand. if i ask that on
. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were different policy choices, different policy options, disagreements. and that if we want to present this crisis, another crisis from happening again i've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head o
years ago and is done traditionally by supreme court justice john roberts, and there'll actually be two bibles used in this time. the first is the lincoln bible. this was used by the president four years ago, the same bible that was used by president lincoln when he was sworn in in 1861, and that will be on top of the king family bible which has been graciously provided for this ceremony by the king family. excuse me. kelly clarkson will then sing "my country 'tis of thee." we're very excited that richard blanco will be joining us. he is the youngest-ever inaugural poet, the first lgbt inaugural poet and the first latino inaugural poet. reverend louis leon of st. johns church here in lafayette park will also be overseeing the traditional service that kicks off the president's day on monday, will be offering the benediction, and the ceremony will end with beyonce singing the national anthem. a quick thing on the bibles. obviously, these are very, very historic bibles, and these are very symbolic bibles as we head into the 150th anniversary of the emancipation problem proclan and the 50th
people who contribute so much to the program. i also want to say a special word of thanks to john horsley, tony keane and jack basso for extraordinary service over many, many years to improving transportation, to improving all that has gone on in transportation for a long period of time. will you help me thank them for their great, great work that they have done? [applause] for a long time. and i want to thank trb for encouraging young people. all the young people that are here. the future is very bright. the future is bright in transportation. there will be many opportunities, and i know that you enjoyed your lunch and i hope that just rubbing elbows and talking to people in transportation will encourage you for the opportunities that lie ahead for you. and they would not really be available without great leadership on trb's behalf for you, but thank you all for being here but more importantly to trb thank you for encouraging young people. when president obama first asked me to do this job we had a lot of work ahead of us. we were facing the greatest economic crisis in over a generation
president joe biden, administrator john pistole and others across the administration in continuing work this week and adding my voice to this critical dialogue. i am grateful for this opportunity to thank each of you for your service, your leadership and your partnership with one another, federal, state and local tribal leaders and especially the united states department of justice. everyday america's mayors stand on the front line of our fight against terrorism, crime and threats to the most vulnerable among us. your engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the
shields and john mcken non. finleysome. >> [inaudible] >> are i'm not surprised. >> a little bit premature since we don't even have a go ahead to begin such a negotiation, but assuming there is a negotiation that does result in a fairly comprehensive free trade deal between the european union and us and it's likely if you take a look at what the issues are going to be that that's going to have a profound impact on the whole regulatory regime both in this country and in europe, going into that what would be your reservations or your red lines, if you will, about the deal that would emerge from those negotiations? what would you be most concerned about? >> you know, i said in a meeting -- i sat in a meeting of the group that's looking at this. and my position stated there was, that we should undertake serious discussions between the u.s. and the e.u.. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was at doha -- what was that, over ten years ago? and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and how uncomplicated it was. and it turned out that
the committee. >> we are going next to john mckenna and michael warren, jennifer to pull him up h. cunningham, stephen cooper and arthur such injured. >> can you talk more about tax reform that entitlement reform, how you see that process unfolding? are those two things going to be linked? do you have a target in mind for the deficit reduction that might be involved and just talk about how the process works. >> in terms of deficit reduction, i've indicated what they think is a reasonable target. i think what we essentially have to do is to move the ratio closer to 73% than it is today and we can have an argument as to how much below that we need. i think the sequence is very clear if i may say so and this is what the republican party needs to accept. we need to do with the sequestered at the balance between cut revenues. we then need to have a serious discussion about medicare. i know there's been some discussion about moving the age. i have several questions about that. i do think with health care reform here to stay, the republican party needs to accept that. we've had, as i said, this ammu
company. >> i try to john about that but i couldn't agree with you more. the innovation is in many ways the solution to the many of our problems there's a wonderful book written by a man called irrational optimist. the man as british and in the book he talks about innovation really solving the majority of the world's problems, what has gotten us here today and reminds us that back in the mid 1800's those people that lived in the u.k. at that time thought that we were all going to die under horse manure and of course that didn't happen because the invention of the automobile, and the invention of the automobile brought other problems, but i do think innovation is the solution, and it's why we have spent so much money trying to improve people's lives through innovation. the way to get that done is by having the best schools, by having competitive schools we have to have competitive education. most of our international partners are educated in the united states. some of them would like to stay here but unfortunately when they graduate they can't get them to stay and they have to go back. s
the summit on reducing gun violence taking place at johns hopkins university. we had they won yesterday. coverage begins at 4 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> [inaudible conversations] >> live pictures once again from the brookings institution here in washington where they're holding a forum on jobs, innovation and the economy. >> it's my pleasure to welcome you here to the brookings institution on a soggy day. it's not too hard to come in from outside on a day like this. this is the fifth growth through innovation forum that we have held at brookings but i'll give you a little background in a minute. it's the third one that we are conducting publicly. the phrase growth through innovation is an important part of the vocabulary to at brookings. we have what we call for institutional priorities under which we try to cluster all of the work that are more than 100 scholars do here. those for priorities are energy and climate, opportunity and well being, managing global change, and growth through innovation. this is i think exactly the right moment to be having today's event. we are in a per
to replace secretary of state clinton massachusetts senator john kerry who was on capitol hill on thursday about his qualifications to the secretary of state live thursday morning it's an:00 eastern on c-span. senator john mccain calls for opposition forces and syria. the called -- >> the bipartisan group that just returned from a trip to the middle east. he remains in afghanistan during his active duty as a colonel. we hope that if he is not held hostage -- some of this subsidy is. duff i'm pleased to be joined with my colleagues, both democrats and republicans who he travels to egypt, afghanistan, jordan, and israel. a man with a broader array of people. also had an opportunity to engage directly on the matter of syria. meeting in egypt with a new president and key leaders of the syrian opposition coalition and to visit the refugee camp in jordan. of one to give my colleagues an opportunity to speak for themselves, and we'll look forward to taking your questions on every aspect of our trip. the main reason why we convened this press conferences to talk about syria. one of the bay nereus
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13